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Old 07-22-2015, 08:22 AM
sdkodachrome sdkodachrome is offline
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Lightbulb make your own Kodachrome? (old process experiments)

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Originally Posted by RichardE View Post
If, like me, you're interested in experimenting with old processes, there are still opportunities, e.g. the old Agfa processes, where formulae, and chemicals (or substitutes) are available, and which can be done with home darkroom gear.
You could also experiment with making "your own Kodachrome" of sorts. It would only work for completely still subjects. Recalling that Kodachrome is essentially three black-and-white film layers, each sensitive to a different color, with matching dyes added in processing, you could simulate it by shooting the same scene (locked on a tripod, of course) through three primary color filters onto black and white film (all three shots on the same roll), then developing that film, and then adding the colors back somehow. Adding the colors back is easiest of course by scanning the film and adding the color digitally, but perhaps there are reasonable analog ways of adding the color back (if you want to keep the process 100% analog)?
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Old 08-06-2015, 05:32 AM
RichardE RichardE is offline
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Originally Posted by sdkodachrome View Post
You could also experiment with making "your own Kodachrome" of sorts. It would only work for completely still subjects. Recalling that Kodachrome is essentially three black-and-white film layers, each sensitive to a different color, with matching dyes added in processing, you could simulate it by shooting the same scene (locked on a tripod, of course) through three primary color filters onto black and white film (all three shots on the same roll), then developing that film, and then adding the colors back somehow. Adding the colors back is easiest of course by scanning the film and adding the color digitally, but perhaps there are reasonable analog ways of adding the color back (if you want to keep the process 100% analog)?
This is essentially one of the original ways in which colour photos were produced.
I tried a similar experiment with Kodachrome, taking 3 shots (on a tripod) on one frame of film, of a candle flame through 3 primary colour filters....the flame was flickering between the shots, so the effect was a white candle with
multiple colours where the different areas overlapped. I've seen pictures where moving water has been photographed in the same way.
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