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  #21  
Old 01-24-2010, 12:10 PM
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I plan to move to E6 and B&W negative.
Kodachrome wasn't my main film. I ended buying a few rolls just to shoot some just "for Kodak's sake".

I recently developed 3 rolls. One of them was in a small picnic we did with some family. Some of the shots were done for getting that warmer light at sunset. They came out neutral (possibly because of the scanner). I remember that I thought there "Wish I had tranny film", so, If I did, I'd have the colors. One reason more for tranny.
I still haven't dominated how to use a centerweighted meter well. In some situations; light fools the meter, and meter fools me.
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  #22  
Old 01-24-2010, 06:26 PM
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I haven't decided yet. Elitechrome is nice stuff, and its lower price is nice, too. I'm trying out the Fuji films, but somehow my heart isn't in it yet. I guess I'll get serious about finding a substitute when I no longer have any choice. I guess it's like that saying about how the prospect of imminent demise has an amazing way of sharpening the mind.

It's hard to lose options. Kodachrome is, for me, irreplaceable. Recently losing nice films like E100GX and the tungsten films is tough. But for perspective, I'd like to mention that there was a time when there wasn't the sheer number of options that we even still have.

There was K25 and K64, no 200. Nothing matched them for fidelity and grain.
Ektachrome X, later 64, which to me was like Kodachrome's evil twin, with supposedly superior blues and nice greens, but terrible reds, orange rendered as yellowish, and an overall coldness.
High Speed Ektachrome, ASA 160, IIRC, which I used when I needed speed, not because I liked it.
Fujichrome RD(?) 100, which had odd, posterish colors and often rendered skies pale and flat. Though it could do a good job on colors like pink. I suppose there was a tungsten Fujichrome but I never used it.
Agfachrome, IIRC ASA 64, which was very nice, warm, with creamy whites and overall nice rendition. I liked it, but next to K64, it was grainier and longevity was a question, as with any non K-chrome.
I never tried Sakura or Konica that I can recall, because having K25 and 64, there seemed to be little point.

There were tungsten films, higher speed films and color infrared, but for regular shooting that was about it.

But what was not available was the ability to choose multiple variations of a film of a particular speed, each differing mainly in color rendition. There was no "Which 100 speed Ektachrome do you prefer?", "Which 100 speed Fujichrome do you prefer?" because there wasn't any choice.
There was plenty of grain, very suspect longevity, in some cases color rendition that is wretched by today's standards.

Back then, the 70's and 80's, the non K-films seriously did not measure up to Kodachrome. The only one with good color in my opinion was Agfachrome, but as mentioned, did not have as fine grain and had questionable longevity. As it turns out, it's held up beautifully. My Fujichromes have lost a lot of yellow, so greens look sludgy and orange has gone red. My Ektachromes have faded less, but enough red has been lost to be noticeable. They look even colder than when they were new.

It's claimed that now E-6 film color longevity approaches, some say exceeds, Kodachrome's. Several have finer grain. Color fidelity is improved and we have a broad choice of palettes. I still like Kodachrome best for its rendering, its sharpness and lifelike "you are there" quality. But though I hate losing it, at least there are some decent options. As the market shrinks, we will probably lose some more of them. But I remember a time when options were fewer and much poorer, outside Kodachrome.

I will continue to shoot slide film, because I love it. I like to have the picture complete at the moment of exposure, needing only processing. It's still a thrill, looking through a box of slides just back from the processor. I love looking at a positive image, transilluminated or projected.

One thing that will change for me is that many of those transparencies will be in medium format. That should be fun.

Last edited by lxdude; 01-26-2010 at 01:45 AM. Reason: clarity
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  #23  
Old 01-25-2010, 08:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lxdude View Post
Back then, the 70's and 80's, the non K-films seriously did not measure up to Kodachrome. The only one with good color in my opinion was Agfachrome, but as mentioned, did not have as fine grain and had questionable longevity. As it turns out, it's held up beautifully. My Fujichromes have lost a lot of yellow, so greens look sludgy and orange has gone red. My Ektachromes have faded less, but enough red has been lost to be noticeable. They look even colder than when they were new.

It's claimed that now E-6 film color longevity approaches, some say exceeds, Kodachrome's. Several have finer grain. Color fidelity is improved and we have a broad choice of palettes. I still like Kodachrome best for its rendering, its sharpness and lifelike "you are there" quality. But though I hate losing it, at least there are some decent options. As the market shrinks, we will probably lose some more of them. But I remember a time when options were fewer and much poorer, outside Kodachrome.

I will continue to shoot slide film, because I love it. I like to have the picture complete at the moment of exposure, needing only processing. It's still a thrill, looking through a box of slides just back from the processor. I love looking at a positive image, transilluminated or projected.

One thing that will change for me is that many of those transparencies will be in medium format. That should be fun.
You just reminded me of my father. "Why did you shoot agfa?" I asked him once. He replied me with a "it was the best at those times". I believe that in the 70's and 80's, Kodachrome was a rare film here. He mainly (95%) shot agfachrome.
Today, the slides he shot are 30 years old; more and less. And seem to be perfect; I suppose they have faded a little, but it isn't noticeable at all.
There's an odd box of slides. A lonely Fujichrome box of 24 slides. It should be the consumer type that was available back in the mid 70s. Most of the shots look a bit magenta.

I plan to stay in 35mm for a while. I still don't have big desires for MF. Anyways, next year, I'll do my trip and I believe that I'll spend 80% of my budget for everything I plan for it.
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  #24  
Old 01-25-2010, 07:12 PM
Chris Sweetman Chris Sweetman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prest_64 View Post
I still haven't dominated how to use a centerweighted meter well. In some situations; light fools the meter, and meter fools me.
Hi Prest_64

This was/is one of the problems of centre-weighted metering. With modern metering systems, like Nikon's Matrix system, they work very well in most conditions and of course with digital one can check if the camera's exposure has worked the way you wanted it to.

There are many 'How to books' out there but one way to obtain correct exposure is to find the mid tone in your composition and use that to determine the exposure. When you are using your OM2 on manual you must take care of light entering the viewfinder as this can affect the metre readings. On auto the exposure is calculated with the light bouncing off the film and the viewfinder is blocked by the rising mirror.

I found it hard to go back to centre weighted metering after using Matrix metering and I have a few frames from recent KR64 that ain't right!

So Prest_64 good luck with your experimentations and don't give up!

Cheers Chris
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  #25  
Old 01-25-2010, 09:39 PM
wlodekmj wlodekmj is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prest_64 View Post
...I believe that in the 70's and 80's, Kodachrome was a rare film here...
But where is "here"? Colorado? Cologne? Colombia?

I'm not trying to criticise Prest_64 personally, but I notice that very few people have put anything in their "Location" box in the Member List. It does not have to be a detailed location - a state in the US, or even just a country elsewhere would help other members of the forum know "where you are coming from" when you write about prices, or the weather, or how long it takes to ship film to Dwayne's. Or about the availablility of Kodachrome

Last edited by wlodekmj; 01-25-2010 at 10:11 PM.
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  #26  
Old 01-30-2010, 02:06 PM
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Location is up. I didn't think much about it, once or twice, and forgot to put it.

Thanks for the advice Chris.
I should look at books sooner or later, that would help me a lot.
Infact, my father had a trip 35 (great agfachromes it made) and most frames in usual conditions are well exposed. I suppose it was somekind of averaging meter that it has got. I'm should retrieve it this summer (a relative has got it, well kept, and didn't use much, once recently) and I think that I should load one of my three rolls of KR64 in it. Just for adding a film to everything that that camera has made. That unit has been used well to it's name "Trip".
It's only a bit scary the state of the meter. It seems to be good for negative, but god knows for slides after all these years.

I've got at least one frame that mustn't be right. I changed lenses fast and didn't mount them way, so the aperture wasn't coupled with the meter. Fool me, with all the lack of time, I exposed it at f1.8 1/30, what should be EV12.

Oh, a little thing I remember. Do you think that a skylight 1A is enough for correct the blue cast of open shade and overcast conditions?
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Old 01-30-2010, 05:41 PM
Chris Sweetman Chris Sweetman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prest_64 View Post
Thanks for the advice Chris.
I should look at books sooner or later, that would help me a lot.
Infact, my father had a trip 35 (great agfachromes it made) and most frames in usual conditions are well exposed. That unit has been used well to it's name "Trip". It's only a bit scary the state of the meter. It seems to be good for negative, but god knows for slides after all these years.

Oh, a little thing I remember. Do you think that a skylight 1A is enough for correct the blue cast of open shade and overcast conditions?
Hi Prest_64

I have an Olympus Trip too! Must use at least one roll of KR64 in that camera! Thanks for the remainder. Colour negative film has a far greater exposure latitude than does reversal (slide) film. With KR64 even a third under exposure can make a difference. But not as bad a third over exposure!

Personally, the only filters I have used for colour film on my Zuiko lenses are Skylight 1A, Skylight 1B and Polarisers. The 1B filters are Hoya multi-coated as Hoya didn't make a 1A multi-coated version.

Cheers Chris
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  #28  
Old 01-31-2010, 01:53 AM
Brian Kim Brian Kim is offline
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I've only used center-weighted (Nikon FE), average (Spotmatic), and incident (Sekonic L-398c and Mamiya 330).

Initially, when moving from the Spotmatic to the Nikon FE, I was fearful. But it's wasn't hard. Shooting transparencies like Kodachrome 25 helped adjusting.

I have a suggestion. It's based on simple because that's me. Manual exposure and fixed focus lenses with slide film. I suggest a short tele like an 85 mm, transparency film like Kodachrome or E100G, and subject distance between 3 and 10 feet.

I don't know how your center-weighted meter is designed, but for my FE, the 12 mm spot in the middle is the 60% of the 60/40 center-weighted. And the standard 'K' focusing screen has a 12 mm circle.

With transparency film, I would move in so that the highlight area I want was larger than the 12 mm circle of the 'K' screen. Maybe 2/3rds of the frame. Then, focus and meter.

For most lighting situations, I would then reposition, reframe, refocus, and click the shutter. For more diverse lighting situations, I adjust by 1/2 stops.

Ideally, a subject with flesh tones will most help your review of your metering.

And if you compare you camera meter exposure values with an incident reading, don't expect the readings to match exactly. An incident meter has no idea of center-weighted across a frame of indeterminate dimensions.

In general, I have less concern with "correct" metering. What's most important to me is a reliable way to meter so that I get close to the exposure I want. Sometimes I want a little underexposed, and sometimes I need to overexpose, and sometimes I just need to get close enough. But I need to know where to start.

After calculus in college, close enough is good enough. The proofs in the slide.

Good luck. Hope the philosophy helped.
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  #29  
Old 02-11-2010, 01:39 PM
Uffen Uffen is offline
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I use a lot of different films, Ektachromes, Fujichromes, negative film, sometimes medium format (I have a Pentax 6x7, too).

I mostly like them all, but avoid Velvia because of the exaggerated colours.
E100VS is good, but is best in bright sunlight. Astia is good, Provia is good but can be a bit harsh, I think Fuji colur neg film is wonderful, especially Reala and Fujicolor 200.

Kodak keeps changing their negative film (at least the marketing!) and it is hard to pin down. Portra seems to be very good. I haven't been able to try the new emulsion.

I used Agfachrome years ago and thought it was marvelous stuff.
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  #30  
Old 02-12-2010, 06:44 PM
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Quote:
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I use a lot of different films, Ektachromes, Fujichromes, negative film, sometimes medium format (I have a Pentax 6x7, too).

I mostly like them all, but avoid Velvia because of the exaggerated colours.
E100VS is good, but is best in bright sunlight. Astia is good, Provia is good but can be a bit harsh, I think Fuji colur neg film is wonderful, especially Reala and Fujicolor 200.

Kodak keeps changing their negative film (at least the marketing!) and it is hard to pin down. Portra seems to be very good. I haven't been able to try the new emulsion.

I used Agfachrome years ago and thought it was marvelous stuff.
Velvia is for me now like leica. Everyone praises it, but I decide to ignore it and not "touch it". As I said before, sensia should do well. It's at a good price and I suppose no bad film. I heard it's An amateur version of Astia 100, not F.
I've used the consumer Kodak and Fuji films (ISO 200-400) and I've gotten good and bad results (the color) that of course depends on the lab that prints. Ultramax gave muted colors but it's a bit grainy. Fuji 200 is nice, I was stuck with this film for a year and not bad.
Just moved to slide, the agfachromes of my father are very nice to look at. Even without a magnificator, loupe, or projector. "A 24x36 piece of life". I love how the reds "Pop out" of the slide.

I have to yet develop my first roll of slide. I even believe that the KR loaded right now in the camera will be developed before that roll. I'd just need an additional one to keep postage costs down. KR has frozen me quite a bit.
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