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  #11  
Old 02-04-2012, 04:59 AM
matt8314 matt8314 is offline
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Originally Posted by RichardE View Post
Isn't Digibase originally produced as an aerial photography film. In which case, might the colour rendering be adjusted in some way to overcome blue casts?
Hard to say. But it's possible. However, if you take a look at this shot with CR200, notice how the yellow cast actually turns the sky somewhat green.



Like I said, if I could find a filter that can make this film better balanced in daylight, it might actually be REALLY good. But with this cast, it's definitely NOT Kodachrome!
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  #12  
Old 02-06-2012, 03:04 PM
nzoomed nzoomed is offline
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Originally Posted by RichardE View Post
From my (very) limited knowledge of organic chemistry from the distant past,
I would expect that the two sets of couplers and chemicals are significantly different. Also, I don't think that the reputation of vivid colors in Kodachrome is quite as simple as more dye being added. (Think of the difference in Velvia and Astia, yet the E6 processing is exactly the same?)

The different between K-14 and E-6 is mainly down to the dye sets used. An analogy might be an artist who paints two "identical" pictures, each with a box of paints from a different manufacturer. However skilled he/she was, the pictures would be unlikely to be exactly the same, since each manufacturer could have used different pigments and chemicals in making their products, even if the names on the tubes of colour were identical.
I think your correct, however, from what ive been reading and listening to the media when they were interviewing staff at Dwaynes, they seem to say that the colours were unique to kodachrome in addition to its high archivability because the dye couplers are added during processing, i always assumed this was because the film was going in a strong chemical bath, but E6 films only have a small amount in the emulsion itself to compare.

What would be really interesting to know, is if indeed the dye couplers for kodachrome are E6 compatible, whether or not an E6 film was made with those same couplers, how the photos would compare, and yes lets compare on the same scale of Kodachrome 64 and Ektachrome E100G.
This would also confirm the theory that E6 couplers could indeed be used to process kodachrome.
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  #13  
Old 02-07-2012, 02:07 AM
RichardE RichardE is offline
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Originally Posted by nzoomed View Post
I think your correct, however, from what ive been reading and listening to the media when they were interviewing staff at Dwaynes, they seem to say that the colours were unique to kodachrome in addition to its high archivability because the dye couplers are added during processing, i always assumed this was because the film was going in a strong chemical bath, but E6 films only have a small amount in the emulsion itself to compare.

What would be really interesting to know, is if indeed the dye couplers for kodachrome are E6 compatible, whether or not an E6 film was made with those same couplers, how the photos would compare, and yes lets compare on the same scale of Kodachrome 64 and Ektachrome E100G.
This would also confirm the theory that E6 couplers could indeed be used to process kodachrome.
I see what you're getting at. I still feel sure that the chemicals are totally different for the two processes. The person to ask might be "Photoengineer" ("PE"), who posts extensively on the APUG forums. He's an ex-Kodak guy, who apparently worked on Kodachrome, so would no doubt give a definitive answer.

Going slightly OT, I think that, going back to before E6, there were basically three types of film...Kodachrome, Ektachrome and Agfacolor-type. Ektachrome and Agfacolor used couplers in the three layers of the emulsion with one colour developer bath. But the couplers for the two films were totally different chemicals, so that the processing was not interchangable.

Eventually, of course, all makers standardised on E6.
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  #14  
Old 02-07-2012, 09:39 AM
sdkodachrome sdkodachrome is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RichardE View Post
Going slightly OT, I think that, going back to before E6, there were basically three types of film...Kodachrome, Ektachrome and Agfacolor-type. Ektachrome and Agfacolor used couplers in the three layers of the emulsion with one colour developer bath. But the couplers for the two films were totally different chemicals, so that the processing was not interchangable.
How similar are the couplers in C41 compared to the couplers in E6? The C41 and E6 processing is semi "interchangeable" in that it yields cross-processed results, rather than no color results at all.

To that end, "cross-processed" Kodachrome developing might be better than no Kodachrome developing at all, even if it wouldn't yield the colors desired. And so, is it possible to "cross-process" Kodachrome any easier than "correctly" process it (with the chemistry known to still exist today)?
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  #15  
Old 02-08-2012, 01:09 AM
nzoomed nzoomed is offline
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Originally Posted by sdkodachrome View Post
How similar are the couplers in C41 compared to the couplers in E6? The C41 and E6 processing is semi "interchangeable" in that it yields cross-processed results, rather than no color results at all.

To that end, "cross-processed" Kodachrome developing might be better than no Kodachrome developing at all, even if it wouldn't yield the colors desired. And so, is it possible to "cross-process" Kodachrome any easier than "correctly" process it (with the chemistry known to still exist today)?

it is entirely possible, but we would need to find some source of dye couplers for E6 or C41 films if we were to try, pretty much kodak and fuji are the only major producers of E6 chemistry and i dont know who else would make those chemicals, let alone supply them, C41 couplers would be alot easier to obtain, but still would be difficult, and i doubt they would give any good results. But would be interesting to try.
It confuses me with all the light re exposures that kodachrome needs in its process too, and that may mean that E6 couplers would not work, as those couplers are activated in total darkness with E6 films.
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  #16  
Old 02-17-2012, 09:12 AM
mrb7 mrb7 is offline
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Originally Posted by matt8314 View Post
Hard to say. But it's possible. However, if you take a look at this shot with CR200, notice how the yellow cast actually turns the sky somewhat green.



Like I said, if I could find a filter that can make this film better balanced in daylight, it might actually be REALLY good. But with this cast, it's definitely NOT Kodachrome!
Hunt for an NoNaD filter. (Neodymium)

Here's the effect. http://www.nezumi.demon.co.uk/nonad/nonad.htm

Where you can find one is anyone's guess. I have no clue.

EDIT: As an afterthought, you might also simply try using a sheet of magenta VC filter from an enlarger set to see how that may help. You can probably pick up an old set on fleaBay cheap enough that you can cut them up to experiment with. That should give you a minus-Yellow effect.

Last edited by mrb7; 02-17-2012 at 09:40 AM.
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