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Old 03-26-2011, 10:59 AM
KR4myF2AS KR4myF2AS is offline
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Default Thoughts on scanners?

With the editing of my last several batches of Kodachrome finally underway, I now have to consider the purchase of a film scanner. An admitted neophyte on the matter, I need to solicit the advice of experts. So... What features should I look for in a scanner? How much should I be prepared to spend? Any brand recommendations? Thoughts on software?
To date, as I have disclosed in other posts, my 35mm shooting has been exclusively Kodachrome (I have a 31-year archive to contend with here!). Based on limited 2 1/4 shooting (50 or 60 rolls to date), my future color work will be on E100G (35mm and 2 1/4) and E100VS (2 1/4). In terms of black and white, I have "standardized" on PanF Plus and Tri-X for both formats.
My intention, for the near future, is to be able to sell my work via the internet (I am currently throwing around ideas for a website design). So I am looking, I guess, for a high resolution scanner, that handles the 35mm and 2 1/4 formats; I have no need for a scanner with capabilities beyond these two formats.
Needless to say, any advice is most welcome. Thanks in advance to those who offer their experience and expertise.

BLK
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Old 04-11-2011, 08:11 PM
hujev hujev is offline
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Well, there's not much available anymore... I've wondered about those Brauns they used to sell on B&H, maybe still do. Anyway, I really liked my Polaroid SS4000; if you see one used in decent shape, look into it. Mine got stored in hot climate for a year and a half, and stopped working a little bit after I got back to it (see the final picture, as it was failing, here: http://rjl.us/photo/colourfield1.htm#lb12). Maybe some oxidised connexion inside - I still have it, in storage in the same hot climate. Maybe someday I'll fix it. Anyway, I think the only serious scanners anymore are the $8k++ hasselblads, yikes.
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Old 04-12-2011, 01:09 PM
kevinkar kevinkar is offline
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It's very difficult to find what we could buy only 10 years ago which were arguably "commercial-grade" consumer products such as the Nikon LS-2000, 5000, and 9000. There were various decent Canon models too which were probably good enough for 85% of us. Those who are totally critical and have lots of money could always get something even higher in quality and price.

Sadly, the advent of digital cameras has seemingly pushed the optics manufacturers to totally abandon film including archival solutions like film scanners so you won't find much out there new that's as good as what was available only a few short years ago.

There ARE some available on B&H Photo as mentioned but I have never investigated any of them. I'd stay away from the simple slide-viewer types that are not that great. I'd also avoid the $20k Hasselblad! Yikes.

You might consider the Epson Perfection V700 which is not bad (I have one). It's better than nothing and can be used for more than film. It will scan just about any size negative. I'd still rate it below a dedicated film scanner though it's rated highly for film.

You can still get Nikon film scanners new but for a huge premium of almost double what they were originally (check Amazon). So, if you have a LOT of slides and negatives and can pay the $2k or more, you should. You could also look on common auction sites for used or like new examples. I had my LS-2000 refurbished by a guy on ebay (a mere $100!) and it's like new so even if you found a marginal example, he might be able to fix it.

Sorry I don't have a better recommendation for you but the hardware has changed substantially in the last 10 years and I'd have to investigate more to even provide a reasonable suggestion to you and I don't have that kind of time! I suggest spending the time to check review sites and read up on the possibilities as you'll learn a lot. Just Google for film scanner reviews and see what piques your interest.

Good luck.
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Old 04-12-2011, 06:13 PM
dmk9561 dmk9561 is offline
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You might try a Plustek Opticfilm 7400 like I bought a couple of months ago. It's much sharper than the flatbed Epson v500 that I used to use. I don't use software sharpening anymore because I get sufficient detail without it. The grain of Portra 400 NC is easily visible at 3600 dpi. I can't speak for the v700, which I'm sure is better than the v500, but the Plustek is cheaper. It does do 35mm only, but it's less than $300. This model doesn't have infrared dust removal, but that doesn't work with Kodachromes anyway. Scans are impressively low in noise and quicker than the v500 was, too. It has the ability to do scans at two different exposures to try to capture more of the range of films like Kodachrome, too. Rescanning my Kodachromes has kind of been on the back burner right now, but I'll try to do one in the next few days and post a Flickr link or something.

The only disadvantage to someone doing lots of scans is that it has to be manually fed. There's no motorized (or large surface) ability to batch scan. You have to push the carrier through for each neg/slide.
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Old 04-12-2011, 07:43 PM
dmk9561 dmk9561 is offline
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Here's a scan I did from my final roll.

I enlarged a part from the window just right of center and put it in the upper left corner. This was taken with an EOS EF 35-135 lens, which has never been my sharpest lens, but you can still see the checked pattern of the curtains and the little key switch on the lamp. It's hard to get all the levels and curves just right, and I hadn't done much to this one, but the raw scan showed detail in the highlight of the white mesh cap at the lower left. Click the link to go to the photo's page, where you can view the original 3600 dpi file. The scanner does go up to 7200, which is necessary to get its highest resolution (practical res. is about 3600), but the files are really huge and scanning at 7200 just to cut to 3600 when most people won't know the difference is impractical.
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Old 04-13-2011, 12:52 AM
hujev hujev is offline
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another possibility that I have heard of, but not tried, would be to use a decent digicam and a slide duplicator with bellows, like in the old days. (which I guess means nikon, since I don't think anybody else uses both a long-lived lens mount and a full frame 'sensor') there are (or were) a few websites describing this. this might be 'the future' of film 'scanning' for those unable (or unwilling) to pay $10k. for one thing, it'd probably be a lot faster...
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Old 04-29-2011, 03:47 PM
Chris Sweetman Chris Sweetman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hujev View Post
another possibility that I have heard of, but not tried, would be to use a decent digicam and a slide duplicator with bellows, like in the old days. (which I guess means nikon, since I don't think anybody else uses both a long-lived lens mount and a full frame 'sensor') there are (or were) a few websites describing this. this might be 'the future' of film 'scanning' for those unable (or unwilling) to pay $10k. for one thing, it'd probably be a lot faster...
This is certainly one way to go. A D700 with an old 55mm macro lens, bellows etc... looks like a good bet.

With Nikon DSLR's with APS-C sized sensors it gets a little confusing!

Cheers Chris
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Old 05-03-2011, 09:51 AM
kevinkar kevinkar is offline
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There are currently a handful of Nikon 5000ED machines for sale on our favorite/non-favorite auction website for some totally insane starting prices. I wouldn't mind paying a small premium over the original prices for a new one but some of these people are asking double or more for them. Totally unreasonable in my opinion.

Now, if I won the lottery, I'd buy one in a heartbeat.

Just pointing out that you CAN find them in either excellent or totally unused condition but you're gonna pay a huge premium.
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Old 05-31-2011, 01:32 PM
ZoneV ZoneV is offline
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Default New Scanner on the horizon - Primefilm 120

There is a new scanner on the horizon, to be introduced this July.

http://www.scanace.com/product/pf_120.html

This is exciting. Hopefully it will be great. Price: $2000.
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Last edited by ZoneV; 05-31-2011 at 01:34 PM.
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